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Data Encryption

Data Encryption: Why The UK Government Have Got The Wrong Idea

8 Aug, 2017

The UK Government Are Wrong in Reducing the Use of Encryption

Are tech companies doing enough to beat cyber-crime? This question is a hot topic in the tech world right now, as the UK government increases pressure to find effective ways to tackle online communication between hackers and extremists. This blog post is going to look at the explosion of the ‘Internet of Things’, the relevancy of encryption in the healthcare sector and the importance of enabling technology that will help make the people and physical systems of the world, smarter and more efficient.  

The Internet of Things

The ‘Internet of Things’ is the interconnectivity of physical devices such as smartphones, WiFi modems and software, to the internet. IoT is a big revolution for the World Wide Web, due to the wide range of applications and variety of useful software solutions it provides, from anything from smart homes to monitoring radiation levels in nuclear plants. However, due to the nature of such devices, they are prone to hacks that either commandeer the device and program them to do something they’re not intended to do, or they can be controlled to do what they’re meant to but in a devious way.

“When nodes in wireless sensor networks are monitored through internet it becomes a part of Internet of Things. This brings in a lot of concerns related to security, privacy, standardization, power management” ieeexplore.com

 

What Is Encryption?

End-to-end encryption (E2EE) is a system of communication where only authorised parties  users can read the messages. For example, companies that use E2EE are unable to hand over texts of their customers’ messages to the authorities. A good example of this is the mobile messaging service Telegram. Telegram messages are delivered faster than any other application, are heavily encrypted and can self-destruct.

However, the UK government’s desire to gain more control on encryption would have negative consequences on the tech world as we need this technology to actually develop safer apps and to prevent the compromisation of the IoT. The optimistic outlook of the IoT versus the security threats is a risk worth taking if it enables us to continue to develop solutions to tackle hacking.

Security is the backbone of the internet, which is the reason we need passwords to access our accounts. By enforcing laws on encryption, the UK government would effectively be able to access to your personal information even potentially data from connected devices.

We have to find a balance between national security issues and safety and security of data traffic in healthcare. Healthcare data encryption is used to protect patient confidentiality when information such as medical diagnoses, surgeries and other highly sensitive data is shared between practitioners and other healthcare authorities to provide an effective service to patients.

Many companies building innovative technologies to improve security are using encryption, and as in most areas of IT and computing, innovation in security springs mostly from startup companies, so enforcing encryption laws would also negatively affect small, creative businesses who actually play a pivotal role in successfully discovering, testing, and building out clever new ways to secure cyberspace.

In summary, as much as banking apps need encryption to prevent cybercrime, health apps need encryption to maintain security and privacy. We need to maintain confidence in the sharing of personal data via technologies by further exploring and developing ways to tackle security issues, using the technology of data encryption. Allowing Governments access via backdoors compromises patient confidentiality, and would be damaging to the progress of improving cyberspace privacy.

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Healthcare

Bitjam Become Official Provider for Keele University Business Bridge

19 Jul, 2017

We’re proud to become an official provider of software and app development services for the Keele University Business Bridge programme.

What is the Business Bridge programme?

Staffordshire-based businesses within the healthcare markets can access funded specialist support, particularly services in technical and scientific advice, collaborative working on R&D projects and design, testing and validation of products. The expertise and facilities at Keele University can help you to gain a competitive advantage, granting a £7000 innovation fund to get a provider consultation.

The partnership between Keele University and University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust allows local eligible businesses to benefit from the expert advice, collaborative working and specialist facilities available from all of the organisations involved.

In order to qualify to provide this service, Keele have to have a number of preferred suppliers to provide services such as marketing and software design. Bitjam have been selected due to our extensive experience working on global healthcare tech solutions.

Collaborating with Local Business

We fit the required criteria because of our considerable knowledge and expertise in designing and collaborating on relevant projects in the health and social care industry.

Our strengths include using an agile methodology and co-production techniques to ensure the most efficient processes and have a team of full stack developers to carry out both front-end and back-end tasks, meaning deadlines are met on time and work is of a continuously high standard.

We’re looking forward to working collaboratively on some innovative new projects, bringing our experiences from the healthcare sector and effective ways of working to partner with other businesses in the local area.
If you’d like to know more about the programme, email Kylie Salmon here.

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Co-production

Bitjam Represent Destiny at Staffordshire University Learning & Teaching Conference

30 Jun, 2017

The annual Staffordshire University Learning and Teaching Conference saw Carl take to the stage as the UK partner representative for Destiny last week.

The event is an opportunity for the University to show ways in which it’s moving forward to embrace digital technology and other ways of innovative learning. The Erasmus+ Destiny MOOC project is the latest digital technology project that the institution has become involved in so it was exciting for us to share this with the attendees.

Can Moocs combined with study clubs help bridge the transferrable skills gap reported by employers?

Carl presented the aim of the research to education staff and students at the event, introducing the project to those who will benefit most from its resources.

The talk discussed the challenges of the project – for example can open source MOOC’s provide solutions for the health and social care sector? Research findings from the project so far, such as the design success of the first mobile e-learning platform that was actually tested on nursing and midwifery students at the University, were also shared with the audience.

Carl pointed out that the future of the project would be a focus on improved virtual interaction for the mobile user. Mobile e-learning has been the focal point for Bitjam and Staffs University, as the main users are students with common access to mobile technology. A demand for fast communication and the ability to learn on the go are pivotal to the development of a student’s education in 2017.

Bitjam’s agile development and co-production working techniques fit perfectly with the requirements of this project as we were able to work efficiently and to a timescale that was in line with the international partners. If you would like to learn more about our innovative ways of working and how they might suit your own project, you can contact Carl here.