Data Encryption: Why The UK Government Have Got The Wrong Idea
8 Aug, 2017

The UK Government Are Wrong in Reducing the Use of Encryption

Are tech companies doing enough to beat cyber-crime? This question is a hot topic in the tech world right now, as the UK government increases pressure to find effective ways to tackle online communication between hackers and extremists. This blog post is going to look at the explosion of the ‘Internet of Things’, the relevancy of encryption in the healthcare sector and the importance of enabling technology that will help make the people and physical systems of the world, smarter and more efficient.  

The Internet of Things

The ‘Internet of Things’ is the interconnectivity of physical devices such as smartphones, WiFi modems and software, to the internet. IoT is a big revolution for the World Wide Web, due to the wide range of applications and variety of useful software solutions it provides, from anything from smart homes to monitoring radiation levels in nuclear plants. However, due to the nature of such devices, they are prone to hacks that either commandeer the device and program them to do something they’re not intended to do, or they can be controlled to do what they’re meant to but in a devious way.

“When nodes in wireless sensor networks are monitored through internet it becomes a part of Internet of Things. This brings in a lot of concerns related to security, privacy, standardization, power management” ieeexplore.com

 

What Is Encryption?

End-to-end encryption (E2EE) is a system of communication where only authorised parties  users can read the messages. For example, companies that use E2EE are unable to hand over texts of their customers’ messages to the authorities. A good example of this is the mobile messaging service Telegram. Telegram messages are delivered faster than any other application, are heavily encrypted and can self-destruct.

However, the UK government’s desire to gain more control on encryption would have negative consequences on the tech world as we need this technology to actually develop safer apps and to prevent the compromisation of the IoT. The optimistic outlook of the IoT versus the security threats is a risk worth taking if it enables us to continue to develop solutions to tackle hacking.

Security is the backbone of the internet, which is the reason we need passwords to access our accounts. By enforcing laws on encryption, the UK government would effectively be able to access to your personal information even potentially data from connected devices.

We have to find a balance between national security issues and safety and security of data traffic in healthcare. Healthcare data encryption is used to protect patient confidentiality when information such as medical diagnoses, surgeries and other highly sensitive data is shared between practitioners and other healthcare authorities to provide an effective service to patients.

Many companies building innovative technologies to improve security are using encryption, and as in most areas of IT and computing, innovation in security springs mostly from startup companies, so enforcing encryption laws would also negatively affect small, creative businesses who actually play a pivotal role in successfully discovering, testing, and building out clever new ways to secure cyberspace.

In summary, as much as banking apps need encryption to prevent cybercrime, health apps need encryption to maintain security and privacy. We need to maintain confidence in the sharing of personal data via technologies by further exploring and developing ways to tackle security issues, using the technology of data encryption. Allowing Governments access via backdoors compromises patient confidentiality, and would be damaging to the progress of improving cyberspace privacy.